Protected trees and hedgerows guidance - A guide to protect hedgerows and high hedgerows

Hedgerows occur in both urban and rural areas and can significantly contribute towards our natural and built environments. Hedgerows provide an important characteristic for much of lowland Britain. The loss of these hedgerows, as a result of changing agricultural practices and development has been a matter of concern for many years.

Hedgerows create attractive landscapes, and often mark ancient boundaries between parishes. They also provide safe habitats and corridors for a wide variety of wildlife. Their loss on a large scale impoverishes the countryside.

The 1997 Hedgerows Regulations give the Council limited powers to protect certain rural hedgerows it considers to be of environmental importance.

‘Removal’ of a hedgerow includes not only grubbing-up but also other acts that result in the destruction of a hedgerow. Normal management of a hedgerow does not require prior permission from the Council.

 

 


Last Updated on Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Hedgerows occur in both urban and rural areas and can significantly contribute towards our natural and built environments. Hedgerows provide an important characteristic for much of lowland Britain. The loss of these hedgerows, as a result of changing agricultural practices and development has been a matter of concern for many years.

Hedgerows create attractive landscapes, and often mark ancient boundaries between parishes. They also provide safe habitats and corridors for a wide variety of wildlife. Their loss on a large scale impoverishes the countryside.

The 1997 Hedgerows Regulations give the Council limited powers to protect certain rural hedgerows it considers to be of environmental importance.

‘Removal’ of a hedgerow includes not only grubbing-up but also other acts that result in the destruction of a hedgerow. Normal management of a hedgerow does not require prior permission from the Council.


Last Updated on Tuesday, September 11, 2018