Evaluate the risks - Identify the hazards

Once you have identified the hazards, you need to decide what to do about them. You should think about what controls you already have in place, and how the work is organised. You should then consider if there is anything more you should be doing.

You'll need to prioritise the hazards you deal with. Consider your existing precautions and decide whether the remaining risk of harm from a hazard is high, medium or low.

If you decide that it is low, then your existing precautions are likely to be adequate. If you decide it is high or medium, it is likely that you need to take further steps to lower the risk. Remember that when evaluating risks you should pay particular attention to the following key areas:

  • Vulnerable groups such as disabled people, trainees, those working on their own and expectant mothers.
  • Visitors - for example, cleaning and maintenance contractors, suppliers, customers and members of the public who share or pass through your premises.
  • The wider environment - for instance, your local community could be harmed by poor waste management practices, eg by pouring chemicals down a drain. Such activities may also be illegal.

 

 


Last Updated on Thursday, November 30, 2017

Once you have identified the hazards, you need to decide what to do about them. You should think about what controls you already have in place, and how the work is organised. You should then consider if there is anything more you should be doing.

You'll need to prioritise the hazards you deal with. Consider your existing precautions and decide whether the remaining risk of harm from a hazard is high, medium or low.

If you decide that it is low, then your existing precautions are likely to be adequate. If you decide it is high or medium, it is likely that you need to take further steps to lower the risk. Remember that when evaluating risks you should pay particular attention to the following key areas:

  • Vulnerable groups such as disabled people, trainees, those working on their own and expectant mothers.
  • Visitors - for example, cleaning and maintenance contractors, suppliers, customers and members of the public who share or pass through your premises.
  • The wider environment - for instance, your local community could be harmed by poor waste management practices, eg by pouring chemicals down a drain. Such activities may also be illegal.

Last Updated on Thursday, November 30, 2017

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