Health and Wellbeing

Please be aware that this webpage contains external links.

Contents

Menopause

What is menopause?

Menopause is when your periods stop due to lower hormone levels. This usually happens between the ages of 45 and 55 and is completely normal. 

Perimenopause is when you have symptoms before your periods stopped. 

What are the symptoms of menopause?

  • Anxiety
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Mood swings
  • Muscle aches
  • Hot flushes
  • Brain fog
  • Reduced sex drive
  • Irregular periods
  • Vaginal dryness or pain
  • Weight gain

Self help

  • Get plenty of rest
  • Yoga
  • Meditation
  • Regular exercise
  • Have calcium-rich food such as milk, kale and yoghurt 

What help is available?

  • Speak to a pharmacist 
  • Hormone Replacement Therapy
  • Non-hormone medicines
  • Contact your GP surgery to speak to a health professional 
  • Cognitive Behavioural Therapy - refer yourself to Insight Healthcare for free sessions (eligibility criteria applies)

Find out more from the NHS website (menopause).

Dementia

There are many types of dementia. 

What are the symptoms of dementia? 

  • Memory loss
  • Remembering past events easier than recent ones
  • Problems thinking or reasoning 
  • Being confused about time and place
  • Depression
  • Anger 

Self help

  • Stay socially active via sporting and art-based activities - check with your local libraries for groups 
  • Walking
  • Visit sensory gardens
  • Attend dementia-friendly cinema screenings 

What help is available?

  • Dementia groups
  • Memory cafes
  • Alzeimer's society
  • Contact your GP surgery to speak to a health professional 

Find out more on the NHS website (dementia).

 

Diabetes

What is diabetes?

Diabetes if a life-long condition that causes a person's blood sugar levels to become too high. There are two types of diabetes: 

  1. Type 1 - Insulin-dependent (there is no way to prevent type-1 diabetes)
  2. Type 2 - Progressive 

There is also pre-diabetes, which is where if your blood sugar level is above the normal range, you run the risk of developing diabetes. 

What are the symptoms of diabetes? 

  • Feeling very thirsty
  • Feeling very tired
  • Weight loss
  • Wounds that heal slowly 
  • Blurred vision 

What are the risk factors associated with developing type-2 diabetes? 

  • Poor diet
  • Little exercise
  • Being overweight 

What help is available?

  • Diabetic Eye Screening
  • Insulin injections for type 1 diabetes
  • Tablets for type 2 diabetes 
  • Lifestyle changes for type 2 diabetes including exercising and incorporating a healthy, balanced diet
  • Contact your GP surgery to speak to a health professional 
  • Refer yourself to Your Health Your Way for their free weight management scheme. Eligibility criteria apply. 

 Find out more on the NHS website (diabetes). 

Depression

What is depression?

Depression is the persistent feeling of sadness and loss of interest and can interfere with your daily activities. It is more than simply feeling fed up for a few days - it is a genuine health condition.

Sometimes there is a trigger, sometimes it can just be inherited. Mental health issues can effect anyone at any time in their lives, and it is OK to not be OK.

What are the symptoms of depression?

  • Constant tiredness
  • Sleeping poorly
  • Little or increased appetite
  • No sex drive
  • Unhappiness
  • A feeling of hopelessness

Self help

  • Mindfulness
  • Meditation
  • Practicing self care
  • Walking / exercise
  • Speaking to your employer if you are in work 
  • Gardening - find out about our free community allotments
  • Join a physical activity or art-based group - ask us about these or check your local library 

What help is available?

  • Self-refer to Insight Healthcare for free Cognitive Behavioural Therapy sessions. Eligibility criteria applies. 
  • Contact your GP surgery to speak to a health professional.
  • Use NottAlone if you are a young person. 
  • Access mental health support services.

 Find out more on the NHS website (depression).

Anxiety

What is anxiety? 

Anxiety is a feeling of unease, such as worry or fear, that can be mild or severe. Sometimes anxiety is perfectly normal, such as before a medical test or interview. At other times, anxiety can feel constant and affect daily lives. 

Mental health issues can affect anyone at any time in their lives, and it is OK to not be OK

What are the symptoms of anxiety?

  • Feeling restless and worried
  • Trouble concentrating
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Heart palpitations 

Self help

  • Exercise 
  • Stop smoking 
  • Eat a healthy, balanced diet
  • Mindfulness
  • Meditation
  • Calming hobbies
  • Speak to your employer if you are in work 
  • Join a physical activity or art-based group - ask us about these or check your local library

What help is available? 

  • Self-refer to Insight Healthcare for free Cognitive Behavioural Therapy sessions. Eligibility criteria applies. 
  • Contact your GP surgery to speak to a health professional 
  • Use NottAlone if you are a young person. 
  • Access local mental health support services. 

 Find out more on the NHS website (anxiety).

Stress

What is stress?

Stress is how we react when we feel under pressure or threatened. Most people feel stressed at some point, and some people find stress helpful or even motivating. But if stress is affecting your life, there are things you can try that may help. 

Mental health issues can affect anyone at any time in their lives, and it is OK to not be OK

What are the symptoms of stress? 

  • Forgetfulness 
  • Overwhelm 
  • Irritability 
  • Sleeping too much or too little
  • Avoiding certain places or people
  • Headaches
  • Dizziness
  • Stomach problems
  • Sexual problems
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Constantly worrying

Self help

  • Speak to your employer if you are in work 
  • Speak to your family and friends
  • Meditation
  • Mindfulness
  • Breathing exercises 
  • Calming hobbies
  • Plan ahead
  • Exercise
    Walking 

What help is available? 

  • Self-refer to Insight Healthcare for free Cognitive Behavioural Therapy sessions. Eligibility criteria applies. 
  • Contact your GP surgery to speak to a health professional 
  • Use NottAlone if you are a young person
  • Access local support services 

Find out more on the NHS website (stress).

Mental Health Support Services 

Support Service Description Contact Details
NottAlone Local mental health advice and help for young people in Nottingham and Nottinghamshire NottAlone
Insight Healthcare Free talking therapies. Eligibility criteria applies Insight Healthcare
Every Mind Matters Expert advice and practical tips to help you look after your mental wellbeing and make them part of your daily routine Every Mind Matters
NHS Find information and support for your mental health NHS
Nottinghamshire County Council Information about what mental health is and what support is available Nottinghamshire County Council
CHESS Crisis Help: Emotional and Social Support - support groups for adults living in the Bassetlaw District of Nottinghamshire CHESS
Nottinghamshire Mind Access mental health support services located within Nottinghamshire Nottinghamshire Mind

 

Breast Cancer

About 1 in 8 women are diagnosed with breast cancer during their lifetime. For this reason, it is vital that women check their breasts regularly for any changes and always have any changes examined by a GP. Men can also be diagnosed with breast cancer. 

What are the symptoms of breast cancer? 

  • A lump in your breast 
  • Discharge from your nipple 
  • Dimpling on the skin of your breasts
  • A change in the appearance of your nipple
  • A change in the size or shape of your breast
  • A lump or swelling in your armpit
  • A rash around your nipple 

What help is available?

Speak to your GP in the first instance - do not delay. 

Cancer support

Reduce your risk

4 out of 10 cancers are preventable.

  • Reduce alcohol intake
  • Stop smoking to reduce your risk
  • Being overweight can increase your risk 
  • Hormone replacement therapy can increase your risk of breast cancer, speak with your GP for more information

Find out more on the NHS website (breast cancer).

Prostate Cancer

The prostate is a small gland in the pelvis and is part of the male reproductive system. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the UK. Most cases develop in men aged 50 and over. Prostate cancer is more common in African-Caribbean men. 

What are the symptoms of prostate cancer?

  • Needing to urinate more frequently, often during the night
  • Needing to rush to the toilet
  • Straining or taking a long time whilst urinating
  • Feeling that your bladder has not been fully emptied
  • Difficulty in starting to urinate 
  • Weak flow during urination

What help is available?

Speak to your GP in the first instance - do not delay.

Cancer support

Find out more on the NHS website (prostate cancer).

Cervical Cancer 

Cervical cancer is found anywhere in the cervix - the opening between the vagina and the womb. 

What are the symptoms of cervical cancer? 

  • Bleeding after sex
  • New bleeding after the menopause 
  • Changes to your vaginal discharge
  • Pain in your lower back, between your hip bones or in your lower tummy 
  • Bleeding outside your normal periods 
  • Vaginal bleeding that is unusual for your 
  • Pain during sex 

What help is available? 

Speak to your GP in the first instance - do not delay. You can ask for a female doctor when you book your appointment. 

Cancer support

Reduce your risk 

4 out of 10 cancers are preventable. 

  • Attend your cervical screening smear test
  • Being overweight can increase your risk 
  • Stop smoking to reduce your risk

Find out more on the NHS website (cervical cancer).

Lung Cancer

Lung cancer is the most common cancer and mainly affects older people. Although people who have never smoked can develop lung cancer, smoking is the main cause. 

What are the symptoms of lung cancer? 

  • A persistent cough 
  • Persistent breathlessness
  • An ache or pain when breathing or coughing 
  • Coughing up blood 
  • Unexplained tiredness or weight loss

What help is available? 

Speak to your GP in the first instance - do not delay

Cancer support

Reduce your risk 

4 out of 10 cancers are preventable. 

Stop smoking to reduce your risk. 

Find out more on the NHS website (lung cancer).

Colorectal Cancer 

Colorectal cancer is a disease in which cells in the colon or rectum grow out of control. This form of cancer is sometimes called colon cancer or bowel cancer. 

What are the symptoms of colorectal cancer?

  • Persistent blood in your poo
  • Persistent lower abdominal pain
  • A persistent change in your bowel habit 
  • Bloating or discomfort 

What help is available? 

Speak to your GP in the first instance - do not delay.

Use a bowel cancer screening home kit. 

Reduce your risk

4 out of 10 cancers are preventable. 

  • Stop smoking to reduce your risk
  • Reduce your alcohol intake 
  • Be active 
  • Eat high fibre foods such as whole grains, beans and fruits

Find out more on the NHS website (colorectal cancer).

Support Service Description Contact Details
NottAlone Local mental health advice and help for young people in Nottingham and Nottinghamshire. NottAlone
Insight Healthcare Free talking therapies. Insight Healthcare

Last Updated on Wednesday, January 25, 2023