Keeping poultry in the back yard - Noise issues and housing

Noise Issues

Poultry like to communicate with each other and, whilst hens are fairly quiet, cockerels crowing can become a nuisance to neighbours.  If this occurs, Environmental Health may become involved and has legal powers to require you to take steps to avoid causing nuisance.  The following advice may assist in controlling cockerel crowing if it causes a problem.  Cockerels tend to crow from first light, and early morning sleep disturbance is often what causes local residents to complain.  If the cockerel is kept in a darkened hen house and let out later in the morning this can delay early morning crowing.  Additionally, a height restriction in the hen house may prevent it stretching its neck to crow.  if there is more than one cockerel, crowing can become more regular, giving little let up in the noise for neighbours.

Remember - a cockerel is not required for your hens to lay eggs!

Egg Sales

If you decide to sell your eggs then you should register as a food business with Environmental Health.

Poultry Housing

Chicken coops and runs, depending on size, may require planning permission.  Also, if you are intending to keep poultry as a business you may wish to check if planning permission is required.  Additionally, the location of the runs and coops should be as far as possible from neighbouring properties, to avoid nuisance.

 

 


Last Updated on Monday, January 21, 2019

Noise Issues

Poultry like to communicate with each other and, whilst hens are fairly quiet, cockerels crowing can become a nuisance to neighbours.  If this occurs, Environmental Health may become involved and has legal powers to require you to take steps to avoid causing nuisance.  The following advice may assist in controlling cockerel crowing if it causes a problem.  Cockerels tend to crow from first light, and early morning sleep disturbance is often what causes local residents to complain.  If the cockerel is kept in a darkened hen house and let out later in the morning this can delay early morning crowing.  Additionally, a height restriction in the hen house may prevent it stretching its neck to crow.  if there is more than one cockerel, crowing can become more regular, giving little let up in the noise for neighbours.

Remember - a cockerel is not required for your hens to lay eggs!

Egg Sales

If you decide to sell your eggs then you should register as a food business with Environmental Health.

Poultry Housing

Chicken coops and runs, depending on size, may require planning permission.  Also, if you are intending to keep poultry as a business you may wish to check if planning permission is required.  Additionally, the location of the runs and coops should be as far as possible from neighbouring properties, to avoid nuisance.


Last Updated on Monday, January 21, 2019

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