Bassetlaw Heritage at Risk Strategy July 2020

Foreword

Bassetlaw has a rich tapestry of built heritage, spread across the district, covering a vast range of types of buildings and structures, both large and small in scale, many of which are designated. These sites are often in prominent locations and help to establish or reinforce a settlement’s sense of place. In some cases, these ‘heritage assets’ can fall into disrepair, for a variety of reasons. In these circumstances, the buildings and structures are identified as being ‘at risk’.

Heritage ‘at risk’ can impact on local communities and the environment in which we live – not only are there the visual signs of neglect, but there can also be social, economic and public safety concerns too.

As the Heritage Champion for Bassetlaw District Council, it is my role to raise the profile of built heritage in Bassetlaw, particularly with regard to its care and its future. Heritage is a valuable and finite resource: once it’s gone, it’s gone.

The District Council, together with building owners and external partners, has secured the repair and conservation of a large number of historic buildings, overseeing them being brought back into long-term use. This document, put together by the Council’s Conservation Team, sets out the Council’s strategy for tackling heritage ‘at risk’ going forward. It also gives examples of where the various techniques employed in the past have resulted in improvements to some of the more important heritage assets across Bassetlaw.

I am delighted to endorse this strategy, which is aimed at everyone who is concerned with the historic environment – whether local residents, building owners, developers, external organisations, councillors and officers. This strategy will help the Council to achieve its regeneration objectives and conserve those important historic buildings which contribute so much to our wonderful District and our quality of life.

Councillor John Shephard
Bassetlaw District Council, Heritage Champion

Contents

Introduction

Bassetlaw District has a rich and varied built heritage with over 1000 buildings, structures and monuments that are regarded to be of national significance, these are designated as either Listed Buildings or Scheduled Ancient Monuments.  In addition, Bassetlaw has many areas that are of special architectural or historic interest designated as Conservation Areas, together with 4 historic parks and gardens on the national register. There are also a range of buildings and sites of local interest referred to as non-designated heritage assets, including both local interest buildings and unregistered park & gardens. Together these are collectively known as Heritage Assets. 

The majority of the District’s built heritage is in good condition, being occupied and well maintained. However, there are a number of Listed Buildings that have fallen into disuse and disrepair. Further, several Conservation Areas have buildings and sites in a poor condition or appearance that affects their character. These structures and sites are commonly referred to as heritage ‘at risk’ (HaR). Heritage ‘at risk’ within the district is monitored by Bassetlaw District Council, Nottinghamshire County Council and Historic England.  Historic England monitor Scheduled Monuments, Grade I and Grade II* Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas at risk, while Bassetlaw District Council monitor these and also Grade II Listed Buildings.   Heritage at Risk registers are published by Historic England, Nottinghamshire County Council and Bassetlaw District Council and are available on the website of each organisation.

This Heritage at Risk Strategy for Bassetlaw sets out the Council’s approach to dealing with those heritage assets at risk identified on all the Heritage at Risk Registers. The forthcoming 2020 Bassetlaw Heritage at Risk Register is discussed in section 5 of this report.

What is heritage ‘at risk’?

The term ‘Heritage at Risk’ refers to a designated building or site that is suffering from neglect and decay. These structures/sites are usually vacant, under used and/or decayed. In Bassetlaw, ‘at risk’ sites include:

  • Listed Buildings and structures (including places of worship);
  • Archaeological sites;
  • Conservation Areas;
  • Registered parks and gardens.

Heritage assets at risk are assessed in accordance with nationally set criteria produced by Historic England. This ensures continuity between the national and local registers. When assessing a heritage asset, consideration is given to the level of risk to the structure, looking at its external appearance, occupancy and vulnerability. The categories range from A - in very poor condition, to F - repairs in progress. The risk scale is as follows:

Category A: Immediate risk of further rapid deterioration or loss of fabric; no solution agreed.
Category B: Immediate risk of further rapid deterioration or loss of fabric; solution agreed, not yet implemented.
Category C: Slow decay; no solution agreed.
Category D: Slow decay; solution agreed but not yet implemented.
Category E: Under repair or in fair to good repair, but no user identified; or under threat of vacancy with no obvious new user (applicable only to buildings capable of beneficial use).
Category F: Repair scheme in progress and (where applicable) end use or user identified; functionally redundant buildings with new use agreed but not yet implemented.

The risk levels previous used by the Council, including in the 2012 survey, were using the scale of 1, 1A, 2, 3, 3A, 4, 4A, 5, 5A and 6 (with 1 being the most severe and 5/6 being not ‘at risk’, at ‘A’ referring to buildings which cannot be occupied). That scale was consistent with Historic England (was English Heritage) guidance at that time. However, now the scale A-F is used by Historic England and so for consistency has been adopted by the Council. For comparison, categories A and B are broadly equivalent to 1 and 2, categories C and D are equivalent to 3 and 4, and categories E & F are equivalent to 5 and 6, although with some overlap.

Dependent on the nature of the risk, a heritage asset will remain on the register until:

  1. all repairs are completed;
  2. the heritage asset is wind and water tight;
  3. the heritage asset is free from structural damage; or
  4. the heritage asset is occupied.

Heritage assets will often move between categories, according to the work undertaken, yet remain on the register.

In certain instances, for example Scheduled Ancient Monuments or ruinous Listed Buildings, the above requirements may not always be appropriate. In these exceptional cases, the heritage asset will only be removed once consolidation works have been completed and a ‘managed decline’ approach agreed between the owner(s), the Council and in some cases Historic England.

Why does heritage become ‘at risk’?

Buildings and sites may become at risk for a number of reasons. Some of these may include:

  • An owner that is not fully aware of the heritage significance of their building or site, or that it is legally protected;
  • An absent owner who is not aware of the condition of their property;
  • The cost of repair works being prohibitive;
  • A lack of understanding of basic maintenance,;
  • Vacancy through death, inability to sell, or inability to identify a viable use;
  • An owner that simply does not care;
  • Catastrophic events, such as fire or flooding.

What legal powers are available to the Council?

Legislation recognises that there will be times where the District Council will need to intervene in order to ensure that a building or site is preserved for future generations. Intervention may be in the form of planning enforcement action, grants and loans, or assistance through the Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL). These different tools are discussed below:

Enforcement:

Urgent Works Notice
Section 54 of the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990, hereafter referred to as ‘The Act’, enables local authorities to execute any works which appear to them to be urgently necessary for the preservation of a Listed Building in their area. If the building is occupied, the works may be carried out only to those parts not in use.

The use of Urgent Works Notices should be restricted to emergency repairs to keep a building wind and weatherproof and safe from collapse, or action to prevent vandalism or theft. The steps taken should be the minimum consistent with achieving this objective, and should not involve an owner at great expense.

The first step of the Urgent Works Notice process is to establish who own the building/site in question and who may have an interest in the land, so that correspondence, and if necessary notices, may be served appropriately to the correct people. This may be done using one of the following methods:

  • Land Registry
    Information on ownership and those with an interest such as a lessee on a full repairing lease will be a matter of public record. Details can found at the land Registry records post April 2000 also indicate purchase price paid for a property.
  • Requisition for information.
    A requisition for information Notice under section 330 of the 1990 Planning Act may be issued to establish the ownership of and those with an interest in the building and or land and where this is not known or cannot be found. An answer must be given within 21 days, it being a criminal offence not to answer.
  • Company searches
    These can also be carried out by searching the companies’ house website.

Once ownership is established, initial contact is made with the owners, normally in writing. If, following this initial correspondence, the owners are unwilling to undertake the urgent works required, then warning letters will be sent. These warning letters should include:

  • Details of a date/time for the owners to afford access to the property for the Council’s Conservation Officers (in addition to other relevant officers such as from Development Team, Planning Enforcement, Building Control or Environmental Health, as required), to enable a visual survey of the building. Access for the Council is allowed under section 88 of the 1990 Act;
  • Following the survey, a draft schedule of works, setting out the works required to safeguard the building, will be provided in writing to the owners;
  • The warning letters should also include the minimum permanent costs required to achieve the security, structural safety and protection from the weather of the building, as necessary;
  • A site meeting with the owner to discuss the works outlined and potential alternative methods to achieve the works is usually arranged;
  • Timescales for this work to be undertaken and set out in a warning letter.
  • If the works are not undertaken, the Council reserves the right to gain access and to have the work done and recharged back to the owner.

Once an Urgent Works Notice is issued, this becomes a charge upon the property, so is identified during a Land Charges search should the property be sold on.

An owner is given at least seven days’ written notice of the intention to carry out works – the Urgent Works Notice that is served upon an owner must describe the proposed works and costs. If the works are not carried out by the owner, the local authority can then carry out the works and recover the cost of the works from the owner under Section 55 of the Act. A charge may be put on the property, so that should the owner try to sell the building in a poor condition, this would be flagged up to a potential buyer. This is to encourage works to be undertaken more immediately.

The Secretary of State may direct, under Section 76, that section 54 of the Act can apply to an unlisted building in a Conservation Area where it appears to him/her that its preservation is important for maintaining the character or appearance of the Conservation Area. The same procedure under Section 54 of ‘The Act’ can then be followed and an Urgent Works Notice served as appropriate.

An Urgent Works Notice may not be used in relation to the following:

  • an ecclesiastical building which is for the time being used for ecclesiastical purposes,
  • any building which is a scheduled monument;
  • Crown land, except on a non-Crown interest in the land;
  • any Listed Building which is occupied (note that where the building is occupied in part, the powers may be used in relation to those parts which are not in use).

In relation to a Listed Building, or a building within its curtilage that is protected by virtue of curtilage association, the need for urgent works does not exclude the requirement to obtain Listed Building Consent should the work affect the special interest of the Listed Building. However, the Council will manage each case on its merits where emergency works are required.

Repairs Notice (leading to Compulsory Purchase)
Section 48 of the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 enables local authorities to serve a Repairs Notice on the owner of a Listed Building, specifying those works which it considers reasonably necessary for the proper preservation of the building.

If it appears to the local authority that reasonable steps are not being taken for its proper preservation, then, after a period of at least two months has passed since the Notice was served, the local authority can begin compulsory purchase proceedings under Section 47 of the Act. A Compulsory Purchase Order requires the Secretary of State’s confirmation. If a repairs Notice has been served and subsequently a building is demolished, the Authority may compulsorily acquire the site in cases where the secretary of State would have confirmed Compulsory Purchase prior to demolition.

Section 52 of the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 enables local authorities to acquire by agreement any building appearing to them to be of special architectural or historic interest, and any land necessary for its preservation.

Amenity Notice
Section 215 of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 enables local authorities to serve Amenity Notices on the owner and occupier of land (including buildings or open spaces), whether vacant or occupied, whose condition is adversely affecting the amenity of an area. ‘Amenity’ is defined on the Government’s Planning Portal website as “A positive element or elements that contribute to the overall character or enjoyment of an area. For example, open land, trees, historic buildings and the inter-relationship between them, or less tangible factors such as tranquillity.”

Amenity notices are particularly useful within a Conservation Area, as they are quicker to carry out compared to other notices. The amenity notice must specify the works necessary to remedy the condition of the land, together with a period (of not less than 28 days) after which the notice comes into effect. Subject to the owner’s right of appeal, the local authority is entitled to carry out the works in default if the owner fails to comply with the notice. The local authority can also prosecute the owner for noncompliance.

Enforced Sale
Under certain circumstances the Law of Property Act 1925 allows a local authority with a debt on a vacant property to register the debt as a charge registered in Part 2 of the Local Land Charges Register. The local authority then has all the powers and remedies available to a mortgagee under the Law of Property Act 1925, which would include a power to force the sale of the property to recover the debt.

The main benefit of enforcing a sale is that the authority does not own the property during the procedure. In addition, it does not incur compensation payments to the owner.

 

Dangerous buildings and structures
Local planning authorities have powers under the Building Act 1984 to take action regarding buildings in a dangerous or ruinous state. Before taking any steps under section 77 and 79 of the Building Act 1984, a local planning authority is required by section 56 of the Planning (Listed Buildings & Conservation Areas) Act 1990 to consider whether they should instead use an Urgent Works Notice or a Repairs Notice. The main powers under the 1984 Act are:

  • Section 77 of the Building Act 1984 – This enables local authorities to apply to a magistrates’ court for a Dangerous Structures Order, requiring the owner to make a building safe, or to demolish it;
  • Section 78 of the Building Act 1984 – This relates to Emergency Measures. If it appears to a local authority that (a) A building or structure, or part of a building or structure, is in such a state, or is used to carry such loads as to be dangerous; and (b) Immediate action should be taken to remove the danger; they may take such steps as may be necessary.
  • Section 79 of the Building Act 1984 – This relates to ruinous and dilapidated buildings and neglected sites. It can be used by a local authority where a building or structure is, by reason of its ruinous or dilapidated condition, seriously detrimental to the amenities of the neighbourhood. Section 79 requires the local authority to serve a Notice on the owner requiring the owner to execute such works of repair or restoration as may be necessary in the interests of amenity.
  • Works to prevent unauthorised entry or danger to public health

    Section 29 of the Local Government (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1982 (‘the 1982 Act’) enables local authorities to undertake works to an unoccupied structure or building or one whose owner is temporarily absent, to prevent unauthorised entry or prevent it becoming a danger to public health. Before undertaking any works, the local authority must serve a Notice on each owner or occupier of the building or structure notifying them that they propose to undertake the works under section 29(6) of the 1982 Act.

    Detailed information about the enforcement powers outlined above can be found in Historic England’s guide entitled ‘Stopping the Rot’ and the relevant Acts mentioned. 

Grants and/or Loans

Section 57 (1) of the Planning (Listed Buildings & Conservation Areas) Act 1990 allows grants or loans to be made at the discretion of the Local Authority (subject to available resources) towards the expenses incurred in the repair or maintenance of a Listed Building or other building of architectural or historic interest (i.e. positive buildings within a Conservation Area or non-designated heritage assets). Loans may be made without prejudice to the Local Authority, including for a term that the loan shall be free of interest.

Section 79 (1) of the 1990 Act relates to town schemes and allows a local authority to enter in to a partnership with Historic England, whereby they identify a group of buildings in a Conservation Area that would benefit from a programme of repairs and enhancement works. Section 80 allows Historic England to make grants or loans towards the cost of such works under the these powers, subject to any terms of interest and repayment as appropriate.

The Council will continue to operate and seek further funding when opportunities arise and as and when resources allow. The National Lottery Heritage Fund and Historic England support schemes within Conservation Areas that encourage the repair and reinstatement of historic building features, their conversion and their re-use. In some instances, public realm works may also be applied for to enhance historic areas and as part of a more comprehensive scheme of regeneration.

Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL)

Where owners are liable to pay CIL for a building which is considered to be ‘at risk’ (as identified on the ‘at risk’ registers of either the Council or Historic England), an application may be made to the Council for a reimbursement of chargeable CIL, once planning permission is granted (for a scheme that would restore the building and bring it back into economic use). This is provided that a conservation deficit is established through the planning process. The relevant form is available on the Councils website.

Any CIL chargeable amount that has been paid can then be reclaimed following satisfactory completion of the work, subject to the rules of the scheme and at the discretion of the Council.

The amount of CIL money invested into these buildings would be up to 70% or 80% of whatever the CIL charge would be for the development that has gained planning permission. The percentage is dependent on whether the location of the building has an adopted Neighbourhood Plan (75%) or not (85%), both minus a 5% administration charge. Further details are available on the Planning Services section of the Council’s website.

A strategy for Bassetlaw

Bassetlaw District Council understands that there are multiple approaches to tackling heritage ‘at risk’. It is also necessary to understand the reasons and circumstances for why the building or site has become ‘at risk’. Bassetlaw believes that it is important to prevent buildings or sites becoming at risk in the first place, as well as dealing with those that already are. This strategy is therefore focused on 3 key themes:

  1. Awareness
  2. Prevent
  3. Resolve

 

A. Awareness

Ensuring that the wider community are aware of heritage ‘at risk’ in the District is more likely to lead to preventative measures to ensure buildings do not become at risk and action with those that already are. This may be through a better understanding of the importance of our heritage and the ways it becomes at risk, help and advice and greater public pressure that focuses the attention of ‘buildings at risk’ owners. Raising awareness is a simple proactive measure that can be undertaken in a number of ways including:

  1. Updating and publishing the Heritage at Risk Registers
    Historic England update the national Heritage at Risk Register yearly. This relates to grade I and II* Listed Buildings, Scheduled Ancient Monuments and Conservation Areas only.

    The Council’s heritage at risk register focuses primarily on grade II Listed Buildings, but also includes reference to those on the national list. This will ensure that a comprehensive register is provided for monitoring purposes and that it is consistent with the information on the national register. The Council’s Conservation Team will aim to update the District Register every 5 years 1 , in order to monitor the condition of heritage assets effectively and take action where appropriate.

    In later 2020/2021, a full District-wide survey of all Listed Buildings (totalling over 1000) will be carried out. This will be done with assistance from Nottinghamshire County Council’s Heritage Team and also volunteers from the local universities. Once this full survey has been carried out, the results will be set out in a new Heritage at Risk Register, to be brought to the Council’s Cabinet for approval before it is published.

    In the meantime, this Bassetlaw Heritage at Risk Register Update primarily focuses on grade II Listed Buildings, but also includes details of grade I & II* Listed Buildings, Scheduled Ancient Monuments, Conservation Areas and Registered Park & Gardens considered to be ‘at risk’.

  2. Ensuring elected members are aware
    Ensuring that Councillors are kept updated on heritage ‘at risk’ issues in the District raises the profile of the issue politically and ensures that Councillors are fully informed about heritage issues that affect their constituents.

  3. Press Releases
    Through the Council’s Communications Team, the Council will ensure that press releases are issued when the Register is updated and when the Council undertakes any activity relating to heritage at risk that is deemed to be in the public interest and does not compromise any confidentialities.

  4. Contacting owners
    Contacting the owners of buildings/sites on the Register, or of problem buildings/sites within a Conservation Area ‘at risk’, is the first stage of understanding the reasons why it is ‘at risk’. It also provides the Council with the opportunity to bring the issue to their attention and offer advice at an early stage.

  5. Education and Listed Building owners events
    Increasing the knowledge of historic building owners, especially through providing information and training events free of charge, is an important part of raising awareness amongst those property owners. The aim is to provide free knowledge and training, helping owners to understand their legal responsibilities for the buildings that they own, to share knowledge and good-practice gained from elsewhere, and to engender a positive approach to tackling heritage assets which are ‘at risk’.

    The Council’s Conservation Team are constantly creating and updating written advice (kept on the ‘Conservation and Heritage’ section of the Council’s website) on different aspects of historic building care. This website also has links to guidance from other agencies, such as Historic England or the Institute of Historic Building Conservation.

    We will also, from time to time, hold events (or take part in events run by outside agencies such as Historic England or the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings) which are geared towards increasingly the knowledge of owners and users of heritage assets.

  6. Contacting the Police and statutory authorities
    The Council will continue to have regular contact with the police/neighbourhood wardens and fire service authorities to share information and tackle heritage crime and heritage ‘at risk’. This can often lead to the Council taking enforcement action, such as the securing of an empty property.

  7. Social media
    The Council’s website, Facebook and Twitter pages are effective ways of raising awareness of heritage ‘at risk’, allowing information to be easily shared around the District.

  8. Character appraisal and thematic surveys
    The Council carries out surveys and appraisals of various types of heritage assets, the most noteworthy being Conservation Area Appraisals. These can identify those buildings and sites which are in need of repairs or enhancement. Sites identified can then be tackled using the various measures discussed in section 4 of this document.

1 Subject to department resources

B. Prevent

Heritage policy and planning decision-making
Heritage policies are being devised for the emerging new local plan, and in certain Neighbourhood Plans, that support the viable new use of buildings at risk. Temporary uses that conserve significance of heritage assets at risk are encouraged to help reduce vacancy for long periods and reduce the likelihood of anti- social behaviour and neglect.

Grant funding and loans
There are a number of different grants or loans towards repairs that can be applied for as and when appropriate. Funding will be applied for under the relevant sections of the Act to relevant organisations depending upon the resources of the Council available at the time in respect of historic areas at risk and where a number of traditional buildings including listed Buildings at Risk are in need of restoration. National Lottery Heritage Fund and Historic England backed schemes administered by the Council typically run for a period of three to five years.

Owners of Grade 1 or II* listed Buildings at Risk that appear on the National Buildings at Risk Register may apply directly to Historic England for a loan.

Building Preservation Trusts
Where a building owner is economically unable to undertake repairs, other options may be discussed and followed. Building Preservation Trusts (BPT) are charitable ‘not for profit’ bodies established to gain ownership of a building ‘at risk’ and invest in it using funding drawdown through grants from other charitable organisations such as the Architectural Heritage Fund. They focus on repairs and bringing building ‘at risk’ back in to use. A Trust may later decide to sell the building on and use the funds to acquire another building in similar circumstances. Owners will be made aware of local Building Preservation Trusts operating in the area such as The Nottinghamshire Building Preservation Trust.

Maintenance
Undertaking like for like repairs to a Listed Building ‘at risk’, where their special architectural and historic interest remains unaffected, does not normally require Listed Building Consent. Carrying out regular maintenance and small-scale repairs can significantly reduce costs of repairs if otherwise ignored or left for the long-term. The Institute of Historic Building Conservation has produced a guidance note in relation to building repairs entitled ‘A Stitch In Time’. Historic England also provide a range of advice on historic building repairs.

It is imperative that professional and appropriate advice is sought before works are carried out, to ensure that the repairs undertaken are authentic and appropriate to safeguard the future of the building and its historic fabric. Owners are encouraged to contact the Council’s Conservation Team, especially where Listed Buildings are concerned. Often simple tasks such as ensuring gutters are cleaned out regularly, roof tiles are replaced where missing or slipped, and timber windows and doors are painted and repaired regularly, can help stave off more significant repairs later on.

Where owners are unwilling to make essential repairs, the Council will, as a last resort, use legislation to serve Urgent Works Notices or Repairs Notices, under the 1990 Act, to save a Listed Building from further decay or structural collapse. This might include requiring steps to provide temporary supports to the structure or to make it weather-tight. However, owners will be encouraged discuss maintenance issues with the Council and to undertake repairs as early as possible.


C. Resolve

Once the Heritage at Risk Register is published, in late-2020 or 2021, it will provide the framework to tackle those buildings and sites that appear on it. Officers will monitor actions taken in the case of each building or site/area going forward. The process going forward will include:

  • Each heritage asset at risk will be assigned a case officer to deal directly with the owner and or agent;
  • Letters will be sent to the owner and or agent to highlight the inclusion of their building on the ‘at risk’ register;
  • Following a site visit, improvements will be sought, in writing, within a specified timescale. A schedule of works will be included. A photographic and/or measured survey record of the building, together with a written account, will be undertaken during the site visit. Historic England may be notified in urgent cases relating to grade I and II* Listed Buildings;
  • Statutory powers, as discussed on pages 2-5 of this document, will be utilised where works are not undertaken;
  • Owners will be required to make a building/site safe and inaccessible, with window/door boards/shutters, temporary fencing and warning signs, if a building/site is considered dangerous;
  • Category A and B heritage assets will be targeted as a priority and according to their significance;
  • Grade I or II* listed places of worship will be prioritised. Negotiations will normally include officers from Historic England;
  • Grants for the repair of heritage assets ‘at risk’ will be offered where possible.

Temporary urgent works, under Section 54 of the 1990 Act, will safeguard a building ‘at risk’ in the short term. However, the Council is particularly keen on encouraging sustainable uses that ensure the preservation of a building in the long term. Where works are encouraged for conversion or re-use, advice will be given to owners that leads to the optimum viable use that is consistent with its conservation. Such schemes can be a daunting task and support will be provided to help owners through the planning process.

The Council supports the appropriate and viable re-use of a Listed Building ‘at risk’ where it has been vacant for a number of years and despite marketing, remains in a poor condition. In certain cases, where a new use is proposed and that is CIL chargeable, owners can reclaim a large proportion of the CIL charge where the building is identified as being ‘at risk’. This will help reduce any conservation deficit where the cost of repairs is greater than the end value, once repaired to make re-use more viable.

Conservation Areas are subject to constant change. Conservation Area appraisals help identify those buildings and sites which require improvements or would benefit from enhancement. Key sites within Conservation Areas which are of a deteriorating appearance can normally be tackled using Section 215 powers where appropriate.

Flexibility and Management
A vacant Listed Building can become ‘at risk’ at any moment as a result of unforeseen circumstances such as subsidence, poor weather, fire or vandalism. It is important to be able to react quickly to safeguard a building when this happens. Public safety is paramount.

The Council’s strategy for cases where a building or structure suddenly becomes ‘at risk’ is to act proactively, using the various powers it has available, to assess the building and take the required action. This may include using external expertise, such as the Council’s Building Control Team or private Structural Engineers. Such buildings will be deemed to be included on the register, until it is no longer considered ‘at risk’. Where this occurs the council may consider the asset eligible for CIL reimbursement. However, cases of deliberate sabotage will not qualify for CIL reimbursement and the Police will be notified.

Watching brief and Monitoring
The Heritage at Risk Register will be updated every five years following a resurvey, subject to available resources. Historic England are notified annually of progress in relation to ‘at risk’ grade I and II* Listed Buildings, Scheduled Ancient Monuments, Conservation Areas and Grade I and II* Registered Parks and Gardens.

Updated Heritage at Risk Register – July 2020

This section provides a brief update on those buildings and sites which were included on the 2012 Bassetlaw Buildings at Risk Register. New additions since that time are not included below, nor are grade I and II* Listed Buildings, but will all be included in the full district-wide survey to be carried out later in 2020 or 2021.

2012 BaR No.

Name:

Settlement:

HE Ref:

2012 Risk Level

2020 Risk Level

01

Pigeoncote, Pear Tree Farm

Beckingham

1370368

4 (Vulnerable)

C

02

Memorial to Joseph Dymond

Blyth

1273833

3A (At Risk)

C

03

Gateway to Blyth Hall

Blyth

1238970

3A (At Risk)

C

04

Milestone on Sheffield Road

Blyth

1239142

3A (At Risk)

C

05

Road bridge, Meadow Lane

Bothamsall

1391658

3A (At Risk)

Not At Risk

06

Lavin’s Cottage

Carlton in Lindrick

1206347

3 (At Risk)

F

07

Barns at North House

Carlton in Lindrick

1280211

3 (At Risk)

F

08

Wigthorpe House

Carlton in Lindrick

1206458

1 (Extreme Risk)

F

09

Wall at Manor Farm

Church Laneham

1276573

4A (Vulnerable)

Not At Risk

10

Pair of Chest Tombs

Clarborough

1045692

1A (Extreme Risk)

A

11

Font at Church

Cottam

1370089

3A (At Risk)

C

12

Iron Railings to Dam at Cuckney School

Cuckney

1045714

3A (At Risk)

D

13

3 Chest Tombs at Church

Darlton

1045727

3A (At Risk)

C

14

Gatehouse Lodges & Gate Piers

Drakeholes

1045046

3 (At Risk)

Not At Risk

15

3 Headstones at Church

Dunham on Trent

1289459

3A (At Risk)

C

16

North Gateway at Church

Dunham on Trent

1045729

4A (Vulnerable)

C

17

West Gateway at Church

Dunham on Trent

1212606

3A (At Risk)

C

18

Former Rectory

East Markham

1223688

3 (At Risk)

C

19

Eaton Hall

Eaton

1267102

5 (Vulnerable)

Not At Risk

20

Bramcote School

Gamston

1223924

4 (Vulnerable)

Not At Risk

21

Pigeoncote at Church Farm

Gringley on the Hill

1156629

3 (At Risk)

C

22

Almshouses

Grove

1212418

1 (Extreme Risk)

A

23

Cartshed, Warrener’s Farm

Holbeck

1267526

1 (Extreme Risk)

Not At Risk

24

Barns at Woodhouse Hall

Holbeck

1223946

1 (Extreme Risk)

C

25

Canopy to Former Petrol Station

Markham Moor

1402678

4 (Vulnerable)

Not At Risk

26

Cartshed, Mattersey Hill Farm

Mattersey

1273784

3 (At Risk)

Not At Risk

27

Wall at Northfield House

Misson

1045074

5 (Vulnerable)

Not At Risk

28

Misterton Station House

Misterton

1045077

3 (At Risk)

C

29

7 Gringley Road

Misterton

1045078

3 (At Risk)

C

30

Haxey Gate Bridge

Misterton

1302728

3A (At Risk)

Not At Risk

31

Access Bridge, Pumping Station

Misterton

1045082

3A (At Risk)

Not At Risk

32

Langwith Mill House

Nether Langwith

1224043

1 (Extreme Risk)

A

33

Ragnall Hall

Ragnall

1276446

3 (At Risk)

C

34

Barn at Ragnall Stables

Ragnall

1233877

3 (At Risk)

A

35

26 & 28 Grove Street

Retford

1045178

1 (Extreme Risk)

Not At Risk

36

King Edward VII School

Retford

1045184

3 (At Risk)

Not At Risk

37

Church of St Alban

Retford

1391188

1 (Extreme Risk)

B

38

23 & 24 The Square

Retford

1045150

4 (Vulnerable)

Not At Risk

39

Stables to West Retford Hall

Retford

1179117

3 (At Risk)

D

40

Ice House at Rockley House

Rockley

1224429

3A (At Risk)

C

41

Garden Seat at Serlby Park

Serlby

1273915

1A (Extreme Risk)

A

42

Tennis Pavilion, Serlby Hall

Serlby

1370366

1 (Extreme Risk)

A

43

Ha-ha at Shireoaks Hall

Shireoaks

1370409

3A (At Risk)

C

44

Yews Farmhouse

Styrrup

1266718

5 (Vulnerable)

Not At Risk

45

Stable Block at The Mantles

Torworth

1222617

3 (At Risk)

C

46

Pigeoncote, Brookside Farm

Treswell

1233883

3 (At Risk)

C

47

Castle Garden at Wallingwells Hall

Wallingwells

1224552

1A (Extreme Risk)

A

48

Walled Garden at Wallingwells Hall

Wallingwells

1266865

3A (At Risk)

C

49

Camelia House

Welbeck

1224847

1 (Extreme Risk)

A

50

Ice House at Wiseton Hall

Wiseton

1045051

1A (Extreme Risk)

A

51

Lady’s Bridge

Wiseton

1156858

3A (At Risk)

C

52

93 Bridge Street

Worksop

1156199

5 (Vulnerable)

Not At Risk

53

106-110 Bridge Street

Worksop

1156225

3 (At Risk)

D

54

124 Bridge Street

Worksop

1045064

3 (At Risk)

C

55

Old Toll Bar Lodge

Worksop

1156540

3 (At Risk)

C

56

Bracebridge Pumping Station

Worksop

1370404

4 (Vulnerable)

C

57

Barn and Stable at Lodge Farm

Worksop

1156602

3 (At Risk)

C

58

Drive Wall, Worksop Manor

Worksop

1156628

3A (At Risk)

Not At Risk

59

196-198 Newcastle Avenue

Worksop

1370074

1 (Extreme Risk)

A

60

Ice House, Gateford Farmhouse

Worksop

1156569

3A (At Risk)

C

61

The French Horn Hotel

Worksop

1392412

4 (Vulnerable)

F

62

Telephone Exchange

Worksop

1359555

4 (Vulnerable)

D

63

Quorn House, 50 Watson Road

Worksop

1045772

4 (Vulnerable)

D

Buildings/structures added to the register since 2012:

64

The Chestnuts, Low Street

Beckingham

1045089

New entry

F

65

Church of Holy Trinity

Cottam

1212380

New entry

C

66

Lychgate & Walls at Church of St Giles

Darlton

1045726

New entry

C

67

Cushpool House, Plantation Road

East Markham

1223684

New entry

C

68

Grove War Memorial and Steps, Main Street

Grove

1421788

New entry

C

69

Boat House, Serlby Park

Serlby

1273928

New entry

C

70

9 Market Place

Retford

1370354

New entry

C

71

Gothic Cottage, Little Lane

Retford

1045133

New entry

E

72

Drakeholes Inn (White Swan)

Drakeholes

1302662

New entry

C

Further details on the above 72 sites are provided on the Heritage at Risk Buildings page.

Historic England produce a yearly update of all Listed Buildings at grade I, grade II* and grade II (places of worship only) which are considered to be ‘at risk’. In addition, Historic England also record Conservation Areas ‘at risk’, Scheduled Ancient Monuments ‘at risk’ and Registered Park & Gardens ‘at risk’. Details of these, from the last survey published in 2019, are provided on Historic England’s website and are listed below:

Listed Buildings

Grade:

Name:

Settlement:

HE Ref:

2019 Risk Level:

I

Church of St Oswald

Dunham on Trent

1370101

A

I

Church of St Peter and St Paul

East Drayton

1212946

C

I

Church of St Peter

Gamston

1224125

F

I

Hodsock Priory Gatehouse

Hodsock

1187689

C

I

Church of All Saints

Misterton

1302717

C

I

Gateway and walls from Manor Farm to churchyard

Rampton

1276407

C

I

Worksop Priory Gatehouse

Worksop

1045028

D

II*

Church of All Saints

Beckingham

1045129

D

II*

Church of St Giles

Carburton

1370105

C

II*

Church of St Giles

Darlton

1212465

A

II*

Church of St Matthew

Normanton on Trent

1233792

A

II*

Church of St Michael the Archangel

Retford

1370357

C

II*

Church of St Swithun

Retford

1370346

A

II*

Arch at Serlby Park

Serlby

1224495

C

II*

Shireoaks Hall

Shireoaks

1370408

A

II*

East stable and outbuildings at Shireoaks Hall

Shireoaks

1045054

C

II*

West stable at Shireoaks Hall

Shireoaks

1045055

C

II*

Torksey Viaduct over River Trent

Torksey/Rampton

1359456

D

II

Methodist Church, Grove Street

Retford

1393069

A


Conservation Areas

Name:

Condition

Vulnerability:

Trend:

Nether Langwith Conservation Area

Very bad

Low

No significant change

Worksop Conservation Area

Very bad

Low

No significant change


Scheduled Ancient Monuments

Name:

Settlement:

HE Ref:

Condition:

Principle Vulnerability:

Trend:

Roman fort and a section of Roman road 350m north west of Holly House Farm

Scaftworth

1018529

Extensive significant problems

Drainage/dewatering

Declining


Registered Park & Gardens

Name:

Settlement:

HE Ref:

Condition:

Vulnerability:

Trend:

Shireoaks Hall

Shireoaks

1000367

Extensive significant problems

High

Declining

Contact details

For details about Bassetlaw’s Heritage at Risk Register or any heritage assets included in this document, contact the Council’s Conservation Team
Email: planning@bassetlaw.gov.uk (address emails to ‘Conservation Team’), Telephone: 01909 533427, Post: Conservation Team, Planning Services, Bassetlaw District Council, Queens Buildings, Potter Street, Worksop, Nottinghamshire, S80 2AH

Copies of the document are also available from Bassetlaw District Council Planning Services.


Last Updated on Thursday, April 7, 2022