Community Governance and Reviews - CGR

 

A Community Governance Review (CGR) is a review carried out by a principal council of the whole or part of its area. The aim is to look at one or more of the following:

  • The creation, merging or abolition of parishes
  • The naming of parishes
  • The style of parishes (eg town, village, community)
  • The electoral arrangements for parishes (eg size of parish councils, number of councillors, warding arrangements)

District council wards and county council divisions cannot be altered in a Community Governance Order. However a request may be made to the Local Government Boundary Commission for England to carry out a review for changes to district or county boundaries as a result of a local CGR.

 

Who can request a CGR?

A CGR can be initiated by one of the following:

  • a valid petition from electors (minimum number of signatures required, depending upon size of electorate)
  • Any petition must define the area to which the review is to relate and be signed by the following number of local government electors:
    • Less than 500 electors - 50% of the electors
    • 500-2,499 electors - at least 250 of the electors
    • More than 2,500 - at least 10% of the electors
    • and specify one or more recommendations which the petitioners wish that Community Governance Review to consider making.
  • If valid petitions are received in respect of these parishes, the Council is required to undertake a (limited) Community Governance Review on the terms of that petition. The requirements for a valid petition ensure that any proposals must have both clear objectives and elector support.
  • a formal request from a parish council or a local member (approval is then required from the principal council)
  • a decision taken by the principal council itself if it feels a review is appropriate (eg the number of electors for a non-warded parish is too large and makes a single election impracticable, or the splitting of an existing parish, or the creation of a brand new parish following the completion of a major housing development)

 

 

 


Last Updated on Tuesday, April 23, 2019

 

A Community Governance Review (CGR) is a review carried out by a principal council of the whole or part of its area. The aim is to look at one or more of the following:

  • The creation, merging or abolition of parishes
  • The naming of parishes
  • The style of parishes (eg town, village, community)
  • The electoral arrangements for parishes (eg size of parish councils, number of councillors, warding arrangements)

District council wards and county council divisions cannot be altered in a Community Governance Order. However a request may be made to the Local Government Boundary Commission for England to carry out a review for changes to district or county boundaries as a result of a local CGR.

 

Who can request a CGR?

A CGR can be initiated by one of the following:

  • a valid petition from electors (minimum number of signatures required, depending upon size of electorate)
  • Any petition must define the area to which the review is to relate and be signed by the following number of local government electors:
    • Less than 500 electors - 50% of the electors
    • 500-2,499 electors - at least 250 of the electors
    • More than 2,500 - at least 10% of the electors
    • and specify one or more recommendations which the petitioners wish that Community Governance Review to consider making.
  • If valid petitions are received in respect of these parishes, the Council is required to undertake a (limited) Community Governance Review on the terms of that petition. The requirements for a valid petition ensure that any proposals must have both clear objectives and elector support.
  • a formal request from a parish council or a local member (approval is then required from the principal council)
  • a decision taken by the principal council itself if it feels a review is appropriate (eg the number of electors for a non-warded parish is too large and makes a single election impracticable, or the splitting of an existing parish, or the creation of a brand new parish following the completion of a major housing development)

 


Last Updated on Tuesday, April 23, 2019