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Bassetlaw District Council
Queen's Buildings,
Potter Street,
Worksop, Notts, S80 2AH
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Worksop

Worksop is the largest town in Bassetlaw and it is situated on the River Ryton at the northern edge of Sherwood Forest. It is about 19 miles [31 km] east-south-east of Sheffield and its population is estimated (mid2012) to be 44,790. Bassetlaw is twinned with the German towns of Garbsen and Pfunstadt, Aurillac in France and Farmers Branch in the USA

 

Worksop is known as the "Gateway to the Dukeries", because what used to be four ducal seats are located close to one another south of the town. These ducal seats were:

 

  • Clumber House: principal seat of the dukes of Newcastle (demolished in the 1930s, but the large Victorian Chapel survives)
  • Thoresby Hall: principal seat of the dukes of Kingston and later of the Earls Manvers of the same family (now a country house hotel)
  • Welbeck Abbey: principal seat of the dukes of Portland (still owned by the family)
  • Worksop Manor: a seat of the dukes of Norfolk (sold to the Duke of Newcastle in 1839)

 

The Domesday Book of 1086 provides evidence that Worksop existed before the Norman Conquest of England in 1066.

 

After the conquest, at around 1103, a castle and priory were established in Worksop. Today, the surviving part of the Priory consists of the nave, western front and twin towers, which date from the second half of the 12th century. Worksop eventually grew into a market town and it was granted a Royal Charter in 1296.

 

The development of Worksop from an agricultural centre was boosted by the building of the Chesterfield Canal (completed in 1777), which attracted trade, commerce and people into the area. This was further enhanced by the arrival of the Great Central Railway in 1849, and by industries, particularly coal mining

 

The Worksop area is becoming increasingly popular with commuters owing to its relative proximity to Sheffield, Lincoln and Nottingham.

 

Welbeck Estate launched the School of Artisan Food who are an independent not-for-profit organisation and they exist to teach all aspects of artisan food production. It offers a unique opportunity for people of all skill levels to expand their knowledge through demonstrations, short courses, and a Degree in Artisan Food.

Historical Information

History of Worksop Town Hall >>

 
Last Updated - 20/03/2014